UK FSA: EFSA’s safety concerns will not provoke CBD product removals

 

Image by Julia Teichmann from Pixabay

EFSA’s decision this week to stop the clock on 150 CBD (cannabidiol) Novel Food applications and publish a litany of ‘data gaps’ does not threaten thousands of onmarket CBD products in the UK, its Food Standards Agency (FSA) has told NutraIngredients.

The agency has itself held similar safety concerns for more than two years that have not been deemed significant enough to shift the safety needle against some 5,980 FSA-registered CBD offerings transitionally permitted on British brick and click shelves while it engages in its own assessments of around 900
industry-submitted safety dossiers.

“The information available does not provide sufficient evidence of a safety risk to determine that an immediate product removal is appropriate, based on the legal balance that must be made,” FSA Senior Communications Manager, Lisa Nelson, told NutraIngredients.

“So while we do not have evidence of harm relating to CBD products, there is also no evidence to show they are safe. The independent Committee on Toxicity has reviewed the existing CBD evidence and from that we have developed consumer advice on consuming CBD.”

That advice continues to be that healthy adults should consume a maximum of 70mg of CBD per day and vulnerable groups like pregnant and breastfeeding women and those on medications should not take it all.

Nelson added: “If we find credible evidence to say that CBD isolates or synthetic products in general, or specific products containing CBD, risk harm to the public, they will be removed from sale.”

The European Industrial Hemp Association (EIHA), which has submitted dossiers to the FSA representing more than 100 of its full-spectrum and isolate CBD-manufacturing members, supported EFSA’s work and publication.

EFSA did this to help applicants improve their chances,” EIHA Managing Director, Lorenza Romanese, told us.

“So we support that. There are no surprises here really whether it is for isolates or full-spectrum CBD – the gaps have been known for a long time."

More here...

 

 

Can DSM Firmenich merger deliver on its synergistic promise?

 

A slide from DSM Firmenich’s presentation next week…

 

DSM and Firmenich’s mooted 2023 ‘Merger of Equals’ will
create a nutrition, food ingredients and fragrances
behemoth with 277 years of collective business
experience and a combined annual revenue pushing
towards €12 billion (£10.2bn).

The deal rivals that of the 2021 €20bn+ (£17bn+) merger between International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF)
and DuPont’s Nutrition and Biosciences division.

The Dutch and Swiss firms have spoken much of the synergies they predict will save at least €175 million
(£149m), while not cutting too many of 28,000 jobs and keeping annual R&D spends higher than most
rivals at 9.3% of revenue – about €700m (£145m).

By comparison, Givaudan spends 8.4% of its revenues on R&D, IFF/DuPont 6.1% and Symrise 5.9%.
More here.

The gut-brain axis: Psychobiotic opportunity in 25 countries

Deep dive into probiotics and brain health. Published March 2022. 
The Gut-Brain Axis (GBX) is a research concept that has moved into the mainstream consciousness via mostly probiotic supplement makers that offer to alter the microbiota via probiotic supplementation which benefits brain health in some way. The scientific base is small but developing clinically, growing fast and boosted by the broader surge in microbiome study across a range of nutritional interventions that include probiotics.

Lumina reveals the evolution of ‘psychobiotics’ in 25 e-commerce markets from the brands winning the most loyal consumer engagement (and how), to the most innovative markets to business-ready scans of the e-tail environment, science, suppliers, regulations that shape the markets.

More here.

Saturated Fat: Nutritionists Press Authorities to Reconsider

As the nutrition science consensus shifts in favor of saturated fat after decades in the dietary sin bin over odious health links, dairy players say it’s time for full-fat segregation to end – especially as dairy under-consumption remains prevalent across the globe.

Armed with what they consider compelling dairy consumption statistics plus an ever-growing body of peer-reviewed research showing saturated fat is probably not – at least singularly – the agent of ailments like high cholesterol, heart disease and obesity it has been tagged with down the decades, the push to have full-fat dairy reinstated in national dietary guidelines is well and truly on.

‘Satfat’-friendly data is being presented to the committees that inform such guidelines while multi-channel dairy education campaigns aimed at consumers, regulators and the broader food industry are amplifying the full-fat dairy message and its potential to elevate across-the-board dairy consumption.

More here.

Personalized sports nutrition gets its game on

Pic: Loewi
With the global sports nutrition market worth something in the vicinity of €15 billion and personalized nutrition around €2-3bn, according to market analysts – the cross-over of personalized sports nutrition in 2021 is relatively niche.

Philipp Merk, co-founder and managing director at German personalized nutrition firm Loewi, says sports nutrition accounts for the biggest slice of his firm’s business – about 40% (immunity being the next biggest chunk).

Loewi was founded in early 2019 as a spin-off from a Technical University of Munich, Olympic athlete-focused personalized nutrition project. Its model feeds blood sample biomarker data and questionnaire responses through algorithms to make its mostly food supplement (but also food recommendations) that typically cost users about €75 a month.

“We have basically combined this super-laborious method with my background in data science and artificial intelligence to make it scalable,” Merk says. “So we have a blood test you do at home independent of a doctor and a database of over 15,000 medical studies.”

“We have thousands of interactions between nutrients, diseases, medications, allergies – really everything that is known – and this is also how we can make sure we are never harming any of our customers.”

Merk says Loewi’s ever-growing data set was driving evermore refined recommendations.

“We have algorithms calculating the individual dose for each nutrient and with each blood test that we conduct we use machine learning to build a mathematical model of their metabolism. We basically have a curve where we know which dosage we need to achieve which blood value. The cool thing is with each customer that comes through the system our model gets better and better. It’s like self-improving machinery.”

More here.